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Discover Carmarthenshire

From Carmarthen Bay in the South to the Western Brecon Beacons and Cambrian Mountains in the North. Travel over breathtaking mountains, through lush, green landscapes and secluded, ancient forests to the vast expanses of our golden sandy beaches. Think lush rural landscapes, crystalline coastlines peeking across to Saundersfoot in Pembrokeshire, the Gower Peninsular and the rugged foothills of the Cambrian Mountains and Brecon Beacons National Park. Make Carmarthenshire your next holiday destination!

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Llandeilo

Llandeilo is a community and town in Carmarthenshire, Wales, situated at the crossing of the River Towy by the A483 on a 19th-century stone bridge. Its population was 1,795 at the 2011 Census. It is adjacent to the westernmost point of the Brecon Beacons National Park.

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National Botanical Gardens

The National Botanic Garden of Wales is situated near Llanarthney in the Towy Valley, Carmarthenshire, Wales. The garden is both a visitor attraction and a centre for botanical research and conservation, and features the world's largest single-span glasshouse measuring 110 m (360 ft) long by 60 m (200 ft) wide.

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Aberglasney Gardens

Aberglasney was made famous by the BBC television series ?A Garden Lost in Time? which followed its restoration. Today it is quite simply one of Wales? finest gardens. A renowned plantsman?s paradise with a unique Elizabethan cloister garden at its heart, Aberglasney offers the opportunity to explore more than 10 acres of magnificent gardens which along with the fully restored ground floor of Aberglasney?s grade II* listed mansion offer a stunning venue for weddings, exhibitions and events.

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Dinefwr Castle and Park

Perched in a commanding hilltop position above the Tywi Valley, Dinefwr Castle occupies a similarly significant position in Welsh history. In the 12th century, the fortress was in the possession of The Lord Rhys, ruler of the ancient south Wales kingdom of Deheubarth. His reign saw a rare period of peace and stability that led to a flowering of Welsh culture, music and poetry. Sadly, it was not to last. After Rhys’s death, conflicts over succession led to turbulent years as the Welsh princes fought amongst themselves and against the English. Dinefwr eventually fell into English control in 1287 and remained there for centuries, despite Owain Glynd?r’s attempt to wrest it back during his uprising of 1403.

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History of Llandeilo

There can be fewer towns in Wales more attractive than Llandeilo in Carmarthenshire, sitting proudly on a hill above the river Tywi. And there are fewer valleys lovelier than the Tywi, the longest river which flows entirely through Wales. The Afon Tywi (Welsh) or River Towy (English) rises on the lower slopes of Crug Gynan in the Cambrian Mountains (Grid Reference SN802631) at an elevation of 1,601 feet and, as it flows through the Tywi Forest, forms the border for several miles between Ceredigion (formerly Cardiganshire) and Powys.

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Newton House

Standing proudly at the heart of the Dinefwr estate is Grade II* listed Newton House, a family home for over three hundred years to the descendants of The Lord Rhys, the powerful Prince of the Welsh Kingdom of the Deheubarth. Cared for by the National Trust since 1990, Dinefwr is now a place for you to enjoy, relax and refresh.

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Paxtons Tower

Perched on a hill above the village of Llanarthne, Paxton’s Tower looks out on the Towy Valley. Built over 200 years ago, the majestic tower is in fact a folly built in memorial to Admiral Lord Nelson and to impress the people of the valley. Discover more about its history.

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Cwmdu Inn

Cwmdu is a small but vibrant village in the heart of Carmarthenshire, South / South West Wales just a few miles from Llandeilo, Llandovery and a little further to Lampeter. It has a strong community spirit which has allowed it to punch way above its weight in what it offers to local residents and visitors to the area. At the centre of this picturesque village is the local pub and shop which have been run by the community since the year 2000. These amenities have lead to the village being awarded a Countryside Alliance Award as well as attracting royal attention when Prince Charles visited the village in October 2009.

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Talley Abbey

Talley was founded in the 1180s by Rhys ap Gruffydd (‘The Lord Rhys’, native ruler of the south Wales kingdom of Deheubarth) for the monks of the Premonstratensian order. This was the first and only abbey in Wales for the Premonstratensians, monks who were also known as the ‘White Canons’ from the colour of their habit.

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Carreg Cennen Castle

Perched on a great limestone crag nearly 300ft/90m above the River Cennen, the dramatic silhouette of Carreg Cennen dominates the skyline for miles around and commands stunning views over the Carmarthenshire countryside.

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Mountain Biking in Brechfa

Brechfa is a perfect destination for both pootlers or those who like to ride totally pinned. The Gorlech Trail, designed by Rowan Sorrell, is made up of three big climbs and descents stretching over its 19km. More progressive riders can also test their full arsenal of skills on the fearsome but thrilling features of the black graded Raven Trail!

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Beaches in Carmarthenshire

The sight of foamy waves crashing onto the shore. The salty scent of the breeze. The rhythmical sound of the tide. The feel of sand between the toes. Whilst there are plenty of things people disagree on nowadays, one thing we can probably all agree on is that going to the beach makes us feel good. Our Celtic ancestors believed that this was where the realms of the sea, land and sky met, bringing great healing and cleansing.

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Discover Carmarthen

Carmarthen sits on the banks of the River Tywi, some 8 miles before this beautiful river flows into Carmarthen Bay. Here Wales’ longest river is still tidal, which is why at one time Carmarthen was reputed to be the biggest port in Wales. Over the centuries the river has shaped the story of the town, providing, defence, leisure opportunities and livelihoods.

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Discover Dylan Thomas

Explore the beautiful and quirky Welsh sea-towns and villages where Dylan lived, and meet the colourful communities full of eccentric characters that he loved so much. Join in the debate and try to work out which of these places was really the main inspiration for Llareggub, the ‘town that was mad’ in his famous play-for-voices, Under Milk Wood.

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Brecon Beacons

This range and the Fforest Fawr uplands form the central section of the national park, which has a total area of 1,344 square kilometres (519 sq mi) also includes the Black Mountains to the east and the similarly named but distinct Black Mountain to the west. These ranges share the same basic geology as the central range and so exhibit many similar features, such as the north-facing escarpment and glacial features such as lakes and cwms (cirques). The highest peak of the Black Mountains is Waun Fach (811 metres (2,661 ft)), and Fan Brycheiniog (802.5 metres (2,633 ft)) is the highest of the Black Mountain.

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Heart of Wales Line

The Heart of Wales Line is a spectacular rural railway between Swansea and Shrewsbury. The seven days/week train service is operated by Transport for Wales. Much loved by day trippers and walkers, the line also provides a vital transport link for lively rural communities and towns across Mid Wales and the Borders. The Heart of Wales Line links to major and urban routes across the UK Network via Crewe, Shrewsbury, Craven Arms, Llanelli, Swansea and Cardiff.

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